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Telework in the News

Telework as a Form of Reasonable Accommodation

Apr 14, 2011 | CAP, webcast
Source: Department of Defense Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP)

The Department of Defense Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP) is hosting a free webinar on Telework as a Form of Reasonable Accommodation on Thursday, April 14 from 1:00-2:30PM EST. Speakers will provide information on: How to incorporate Telework and CAP into reasonable accommodation pipelines; How Telework as a Form of reasonable accommodation can strengthen retention strategies; and, Assistive technology solutions and best practices. Registration is open until April 12; register today by emailing DexterityTeam@tma.osd.mil

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Comments
Rosanne Russo Apr 19, 2011 8:10 am

Unfortunately I was not able to participate in this discussion. I am very interested in Telework and reasonable Accommodation. Is there a way to get a copy of the actual webcast discussion and any documents presented? If so, I would greatly appreciate it.


Rosanne Russo Apr 19, 2011 8:10 am

Unfortunately I was not able to participate in this discussion. I am very interested in Telework and reasonable Accommodation. Is there a way to get a copy of the actual webcast discussion and any documents presented? If so, I would greatly appreciate it.


Telework Exchange Apr 20, 2011 2:52 pm

Rosanne, we will look into this and let you know where to find it.


Ismael Feb 15, 2016 1:13 am

Why do so many people start rpoesnses with, Look at X where X is some key source of information for the discussion? Implicit in that statement is, You haven't looked at X. Even worse, it almost always comes with the form, If you had looked at X, you'd agree with me. And as though that form isn't bad enough, X is almost always some general resource where looking into it would require far more time than the speaker has invested.Scott, if you want to do nothing but assign homework, find someone more gullible. I already know plenty about the B612 Foundation, including how they consistently exaggerate things and overstate certainty to drum up concern. What they've published about the Tunguska event is a perfect example. They say over 1,000 square miles were destroyed by a 40 meter asteroid. Even the most basic of fact checking will find the area was about 800 square miles. Estimates on Tunguska asteroid size have almost all been at least 50 meters, and many have gone up to 150 meters or more.Heck, it isn't even known the Tunguska event was caused by an asteroid. Who is going to put their faith in the B612 Foundation when it can't even be accurate on basic points like that?If scientists are going to save the world, it's not going to be by rejecting the scientific method.


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